Values

engagement & community involvement

description:

We envision a diverse community of individuals actively engaged and involved in advancing common goals by:

  • Proposing creative new strategies and solutions
  • Working with key decision makers on programs and policies
  • Holding decision makers accountable
  • Voting
  • Activating their personal and professional networks
  • Collaborating with groups and individuals throughout the city and across disciplines

view related posts

equal opportunity & social mobility

description:

We envision an Omaha where ALL people have equal access and opportunity. Omaha must break down its segregation, strive towards equality in education for all ages, and develop efficient public transportation that directly addresses existing and future needs. VOICE will promote efforts resulting in equal pay, employment and legal treatment for those facing discrimination.

view related posts

sustainability

description:

We envision Omaha as a city that upholds sustainable practices and behaviors as a minimum standard. VOICE believes environmental impact must be minimized in all public initiatives, and supports innovations that protect and enhance our natural environment. We will pursue socially just environmental policy where decision makers are held accountable and all citizens have the opportunity to support environmental progress.

view related posts

transparency

description:

We envision a transparent and accessible decision-making process in all public matters to ensure a healthy democracy and vibrant community. VOICE will initiate and promote efforts that grant community members open access to information, and facilitate openness, engagement, accountability, and access.

This includes:

  • Free and easy access to information, meetings and discussions by public officials and community leaders.
  • Full disclosure of budgets, financial statements, and conflicts of interest
  • A clear and active process for gathering and incorporating public input on major community decisions.
  • In doing so, we will reduce the likelihood of corruption, conflicts of interest, and poor governance and increase public ownership and involvement in our community.

view related posts

advocacy for arts and culture

description:

We envision a city that acknowledges the transformative role artists and art play in defining and redefining American cities. Artists and art should occupy a central place in the future of Omaha. VOICE advocates leveraging Omaha citizens’ investments in creativity and artists to bring about unforeseen models and ecstatic possibilities for this city.

view related posts

smart urban development

description:

We envision an Omaha that respects existing neighborhoods by focusing growth towards its established core, values walkable mixed-used development, and rewards environmentally responsible building practices. Omaha benefits most from organic and authentic local development that promotes socio-economic and cultural diversity and places a high value on design quality.

view related posts

Engagement & Community Involvement

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

Early voting has already started, but we thought it might be helpful to have a guide to take with you when you vote. So here it is – everything you need to know when you visit the polls.

Print our guide and take it with you.

Detailed summaries of these races and our endorsements are also available.

Comments Off

Engagement & Community Involvement, News, Transparency

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District Board

Term: four years

Board Size: Eleven members represented by subdistricts. Five subdistricts are up for election this year.

Candidates: – District 1: Scott Japp, Chris J. Koenig
- District 3: Brandon Clark, Curt Frost
- District 5: Brad Dunbar, Rich Tesar
- District 7: Patrick Leahy, Jim Powers
- District 9: Patrick Bonnett

Why you should care

- The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resource District Board has a budget of around $87 million, $17 million of which is raised in property taxes.

- It is responsible for natural resource management in a 6 county area, including Douglas and Sarpy counties and counties to our north.

- The Board focuses on flood control, ground and surface water quality, soil erosion, public recreation including trails, and to some extent wildlife.

- It is the organization that often funds the construction of a dam, such as the newly approved 135-acre lake near 126th & Cornhusker Road in Sarpy County.

Subdistrict 1: Scott Japp

- Brings a rural perspective to this Board that guides work in 6 counties, along with experience in soil conservation and construction.

- Japp believes a combination of levees and low impact development (LIDs) should be used for flood protection and more natural stormwater management. He will not support the building of large dams because dams harm the stream environment and habitat.

- Japp says that NRD should not be be a funding source for developers, yet at the present time NRD board aids developers with financial support, engineering and planning.  He also believes more procedures for public input and information sharing are needed, as well as more control of the meeting agenda by individual Board members.

Who you should vote for:

Subdistrict 3 – No endorsement (no response from either candidate)

Subdistrict 5: Rich Tesar

- With twenty years of experience on the NRD Board, Tesar understands the issues the Board addresses.

- Tesar believes water is our most important natural resource in Nebraska and advocates for flood protection and water quality as well as recreational access and trails for the public. He wants to use the ‘newer’ concept of low impact development in some instances when it makes sense.

- Tesar was appointed by the Governor to serve on the state’s Riparian Vegetation Protection Task Force, which worked to clear invasive species from the Platte River.

- See http://richtesar.com/ for an extensive website on Tesar’s contributions as part of the NRD Board.

Subdistrict 7: Jim Powers

- Powers is motivated to improve the recreational trails system in the district, and specifically motivated to improve trail maintenance and the maintenance process.

- He has a good sense for environmental issues the NRD Board needs to address and brings support for more natural methods of stormwater management such as bioretention areas, to the Board.

- Powers brings nearly 30 years of professional experience as an attorney to the Board, along with a passion for making a positive impact on the NRD Board.  His ability to easily understand contracts and funding mechanisms will provide the Board with an important perspective.

- See http://jimpowersnrd.com/

Subdistrict 9:  No endorsement

1 Comment »

Engagement & Community Involvement, Transparency

Sunday, October 21st, 2012

Term: Four years
Board Size: Twelve
Candidates:
– Subdistrict 2: James English & Freddie Gray
- Subdistrict 4: Sarah Brumfield & Oscar Duran
- Subdistrict 8: Andy Allen & Danyelle Baratta
- Subdistrict 12: Jennifer Tompkins Kirshenbam & Patrick Bourne

Why you should care:

  • They are in charge of selecting the OPS Superintendent. As you know from recent events, this has become a more critical and time-sensitive endeavor than ever.
  • They are in charge of the appointment and dismissal of employees, setting salaries, and guiding the course of education throughout all Omaha Public Schools.
  • They are in charge of adopting the OPS budget (where a significant portion of your real estate taxes go).
  • They are responsible for preparing and publishing the body of policies and regulations for the OPS system.
  • They serve as ambassadors and advocates for OPS on district, state, and national levels.

Who you should vote for:

Subdistrict 2: Freddie Gray (D)

  • Qualifications: Served on OPS Board of Education since 2008; served on National School Boards Association/Council of Urban Boards of Education Racial Isolation Task Force, NE Association of School Boards, African Achievement Council, Douglas County Board of Health
  • Priorities: To increase student achievement, Ms. Gray plans to partner with community stakeholders to address issues outside the scope of the school district’s work; accelerate quality early childhood education to help children arrive at school ready to learn; and recruit and retain highly qualified teachers and principals.
  • Subdistrict 4: Oscar Duran (NP)

    • Qualifications: Various board membership; Creation of numerous youth driven community initiatives
    • Priorities: Promote strengths-based development; Increase community collaboration; Emphasis on service learning

    Subdistrict 8: No endorsement

    Subdistrict 12: Patrick Bourne (D)

    • Qualifications: Law Degree (Creighton University, 1997); Former State Senator (8th Legislative District)
    • Priorities: Create strategic plan for OPS; Increase transparency; Increase graduation rates

    1 Comment »

    Engagement & Community Involvement, Transparency

    Friday, October 19th, 2012

    Omaha Public Power District Board of Directors

    Term: Six Years
    Board Size: eight
    Candidates: Tom Barrett, Mike Cavanaugh, Sandy Dodge, George Mills
    Why you should care:

    - You use electricity everyday. OPPD is the sole source from which you can buy it. They set the price, and you don’t have a choice.

    - The majority of OPPD’s power is created by burning coal, which emits some pretty nasty stuff into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming.

    - OPPD’s nuclear power plant in Fort Calhoun has been shut down for over a year due to several issues. Bringing it back online is really important and very costly.

    Who you should vote for:

    Sandy Dodge

    Sandy Dodge demonstrated an in-depth knowledge of the issues that no other candidate could hold a candle to. We expected expertise given his long tenure on the board, but Mr. Dodge exceeded our expectations. Every question we asked was met with a clearly articulated response. His depth of knowledge is critical for OPPD at a time when several critical issues must be resolved.

    We have yet to hear OPPD’s management acknowledge that climate change exists and that humans are, to some extent, causing it. Mr. Dodge believes both and certainly understands that OPPD’s coal-fired power plant emissions are not only contributing to climate change, but they are also emitting other bad pollutants. Sandy is wholly in favor of OPPD’s current efforts to help its customers conserve electricity and is also in favor of expanding renewables.

    Getting OPPD’s Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant back online is extremely important, and Mr. Dodge understands what it’s going to take to do so. The decision to outsource management of the plant was a good one and will likely move things forward quicker. It might, in fact, result in significant cost savings in the long-run.

    George Mills

    George Mills believes it is time for new blood on the OPPD board.  He believes the current board all too often “rubber stamps” the directives and policies from OPPD’s management. At the same time, he is someone who believes in collaboration, is open to new ideas, and will study issues to find the best solutions.

    George served several years as a Douglas County commissioner. During his tenure he helped form several “Blue Ribbon” commissions to study and implement various projects including the combined 911 center and the Aksarben Village development.  George understands what it takes to manage a large entity and to be a good steward of tax payer money.

    George has the experience and passion to be an excellent representative to the OPPD board. He will bring a new perspective to the board and a vision for its future.

    1 Comment »

    News

    Sunday, October 14th, 2012

    -

    Term: Six Years
    Board Size: eight
    Candidates: Jim Begley, Dave Friend, John McCollister, Megan Murphy (top two vote-getters are elected)

    Why you should care:

    - You use water and natural gas everyday, right? MUD is the sole source from which you can buy it. They set the price, and you don’t have a choice. Kind of a big deal.

    - MUD is working with the City of Omaha and other entities (OPPD, Cox Communications, etc) on a massive sewer separation as mandated by the EPA. It’s big, complicated and expensive; mismanagement would be a serious problem.

    - The Board creates and approves regulatory rules for MUD, approves the budget and major expenditures, employee hiring, terminations and contracts; sets wage and benefit packages for all non-union personnel.

    Who you should vote for:

    John McCollister

    Yup, we were surprised by this one, too. While we may not perfectly agree with Mr. McCollister on several other issues, he is well-suited to serve on the MUD board. Throughout the course of our interview we found him to be extremely knowledgeable of the issues, thoughtful and analytical in his decision-making approach, and supportive of MUD’s conservation-focused activities.

    MUD is facing a challenging trend wherein their volumes (sales) are flat but their expenses continue to climb. This trend presents a significant challenge for MUD’s board and management. Mr. McCollister indicated he’s in favor of a balanced approach to combat this issue, which is to say he believes a flat fee is appropriate for creating more revenue while cost cutting must still be a focus. As for which costs to cut, he specifically mentioned employee fringe benefits and the health insurance plan as likely targets.

    We also agreed with Mr. McCollister’s positions on conservation (current efforts are worthwhile and should continue if not expand; reduce carbon footprint), and compressed natural gas (MUD should continue to invest in infrastructure and public/private partnerships).

    Jim Begley

    Mr. Begley will provide an important and new perspective to the board. His focus on protecting the interests of MUD’s workforce was unique amongst his challengers and will serve MUD’s interests well.

    He has never served on the MUD board but was adequately knowledgeable of the issues. He was particularly keen on expanding MUD’s social media presence (basically nonexistent today) in order to better communicate with customers; an approach we completely agree with. Mr. Begley also foresees a clear and meaningful role for MUD in developing a compressed natural gas market, and he passionately advocated for the utility to help its customers conserve water and natural gas consumption.

    Mr. Begley also advocated for a balanced approach to fixing MUD’s budget challenges, although he foresees different mechanisms by which increase revenue (rate increases) and decrease costs (some upper-level management positions might be worth eliminating).

    Comments Off

    The candidates elected this November will play a huge role in shaping our future. And while the races at the top of the ballot are unquestionably important, the local races may very well have a bigger impact on Omahans’ day-to-day lives.

    VOICE’s steering committee spent the past month digging into a handful of races at all levels of the ballot, and we are endorsing several candidates. Our VOICE-approved slate is below with a few bullets explaining why we endorse those candidates. Over the course of the next few weeks, we will post a more in-depth summary of each of these races.

    We took this effort very seriously. We did our homework. Our research methodologies varied a bit for each race; they generally included face-to-face interviews, open-ended written response questions, phone interviews, discussions with others knowledgeable of the candidates and the issues, and independent research. We also refrained from making selections based upon party lines. Our endorsements are based solely on who we believe is be the best Omahan for the job.

    We encourage you to vote for the following candidates:

    Omaha Public Power District Board of Directors

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    Sandy Dodge (D)

    - Articulated a clear and in-depth understanding of the issues

    - Demonstrated a vision for renewables, conservation and OPPD’s role in mitigating climate change

    - Very supportive of OPPD’s programs to help its customers reduce energy consumption

    - Energy challenge of the 21st century: meeting the growing demand for global energy demand while not ruining the earth’s atmosphere

    George Mills (R)

    - High focus on transparency and providing more information to the public

    - Acknowledged that climate change is happening and that humans play a role

    - Service as a Douglas County Commissioner shows great leadership capabilities

    - Would strive to be an independent voice on the board, working for consensus and collaboration rather than “rubber stamping” decisions from management

    Metropolitan Utilities District Board of Directors

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    John McCollister (R)

    - Demonstrated a clear understanding of MUD’s business model and upcoming challenges

    - Advocated for a balanced approach (flat fee + cost cutting) to maintaining fiscal soundness

    - Believes MUD’s conservation efforts are worthwhile and supportive of decreasing MUD’s carbon footprint and reducing pollution

    - Greatest energy challenge of the 21st century: successful interface and balance between government intervention and the realities of the energy world

    Jim Begley (D)

    - Will be a strong proponent for MUD’s workforce

    - Strongly advocated for better conservation efforts and a more meaningful social media presence

    - Sees a clear and meaningful role for MUD to play in building compressed natural gas infrastructure

    - Greatest energy challenge of the 21st century: weaning ourselves off of foreign oil and mitigating climate change

    Omaha School Board

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    Subdistrict 2: Freddie Gray (D)

    - Qualifications: Served on OPS Board of Education since 2008; served on National School Boards Association/Council of Urban Boards of Education Racial Isolation Task Force, NE Association of School Boards, African Achievement Council, Douglas County Board of Health

    - Priorities: To increase student achievement, Ms. Gray plans to partner with community stakeholders to address issues outside the scope of the school district’s work; accelerate quality early childhood education to help children arrive at school ready to learn; and recruit and retain highly qualified teachers and principals.

    Subdistrict 4: Oscar Duran (NP)

    - Qualifications: Various board membership; Creation of numerous youth driven community initiatives

    - Priorities: Promote strengths-based development; Increase community collaboration; Emphasis on service learning

    Subdistrict 8: No endorsement

    Subdistrict 12: Patrick Bourne (D)

    - Qualifications: Law Degree (Creighton University, 1997); Former State Senator (8th Legislative District)

    - Priorities: Create strategic plan for OPS; Increase transparency; Increase graduation rates

    University of Nebraska Board of Regents

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    District 4: Bob Whitehouse (R)

    - Has served on the Board of Regents since 2006 and was the 2011 Chairman

    - Supports stem cell research

    - Supports legislation and university policies that provide equal opportunity to students and staff including the Dream Act and the Employee +1 benefits policy

    - Strong proponent for research across the University system as it relates to Nebraska

    - Advocate for early childhood education

    District 8: Ann Ferlic Ashford (R)

    -Articulates clear ideas to connect graduates with jobs

    -Supports stem cell research

    -Supports legislation and university policies that provide equal opportunity to students and staff including the Dream Act and the Employee +1 benefits policy

    -Prioritizes rising tuition rates as the most pressing issue facing students

    -Committed to listening to her constituents

    Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    Subdistrict 1: Scott Japp (R)

    -Brings a rural perspective and experience in soil conservation and construction

    -Believes a combination of levees and low impact development (LIDs) should be used for flood protection and more natural stormwater management

    -Will not support the building of large dams because dams harm the stream environment and habitat

    -Believes the NRD should not be be a funding source for developers and believes more procedures for public input and information sharing are needed, as well as more control of the meeting agenda by individual Board members

    Subdistrict 3 – No endorsement; neither candidate responded to multiple requests.

    Subdistrict 5: Rich Tesar (R)

    -With twenty years of experience on the NRD Board, Tesar understands the issues the Board addresses.

    -Believes water is our most important natural resource in Nebraska and advocates for flood protection and water quality as well as recreational access and trails for the public

    -Wants to use the ‘newer’ concept of low impact development in some instances when it makes sense

    -Tesar was appointed by the Governor to serve on the state’s Riparian Vegetation Protection Task Force, which worked to clear invasive species from the Platte River.

    Subdistrict 7: Jim Powers (D)

    -Powers is motivated to improve the recreational trails system in the district, and specifically motivated to improve trail maintenance and the maintenance process.

    -He has a good sense for environmental issues the NRD Board needs to address and brings support for more natural methods of stormwater management such as bioretention areas, to the Board.

    -Brings nearly 30 years of professional experience as an attorney to the Board, along with a passion for making a positive impact on the NRD Board.  His ability to easily understand contracts and funding mechanisms will provide the Board with an important perspective.

    Subdistrict 9 – no endorsement

    United States House of Representatives – District 2

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    John Ewing (D)

    -An experienced and dedicated public servant, a former Deputy Chief of Police for Omaha and current Douglas County Treasurer.

    -As Douglas County Treasurer, Ewing broke through beaurocratic red tape to modernize that office increasing efficiency through the use of on-line tools. He accomplished this while coming in under final budget numbers every year he has served Douglas County.

    -Ewing supports preservation of the current structure of Medicare while making principled changes to its administration to lower costs of the program that would support its solvency and its reliability.

    -Ewing pledges to address federal budget deficit problems by focusing on waste and inefficiency and has proven as Douglas County Treasurer to concentrate on the real financial impact of changes, instead of their political impacts.

    United States Senate

    See detailed endorsement summary here.

    Bob Kerrey (D)

    -An experienced, principled candidate with a long track record of working in a bipartisan manner, most notably on the national 9/11 Commission.

    -Nebraska-born and Nebraska-educated, Kerrey is a consistent supporter of civil rights for all Americans, which includes voting against the Defense of Marriage Act in 1996.

    -Proposes pragmatic solutions to address federal deficits with specific proposals to reduce federal budgets by 15 percent, impose a three-year pay freeze on federal cvilian workers and reduce the number of federal workers.

    -Supports environmental policies that acknowledge and address the human contributions to climate change.

    -”No one can tell Bob to do anything,” Alan Simpson, a former Republican senator from Wyoming, said of Bob Kerrey. “That’s a wonderful trait.”

    President of the United States

    Barack Obama (D)

    President Barack Obama

    - Decisive at a time when America was headed for the worst economic crash since the Great Depression

    - Invested in green technology and innovation

    - Values the unique role of government in protecting its citizens as evidenced by his public support of pay equity, GLBT civil rights and the Dream Act

    - Works both sides of the issue and reaches across party lines

    - Believes people are entitled to health care, food and housing

    1 Comment »

    As Omahans who appreciate having options in our transportation, we would like to wish a happy fortieth anniversary to the Transit Authority for the City of Omaha — Metro Transit. Over the last four decades, the Transit Authority has provided an admirable level of service to our city for the dollars spent.

    Operating seven days per week, and taking only six service holidays a year, Metro Transit works hard to ensure a viable transportation mode for those who want options in their mobility. More important, Metro has been a reliable partner in providing mobility to those who have few options. In a city where housing and commerce are often separated by many miles, Metro Transit provides a critical link connecting people to their jobs, their schools, their friends and vital services.

    In addition to maintaining a necessary service to the community, the current administration at Metro Transit has proved to be vigilant fiscal stewards. Both our fare costs and tax burden for transit are some of the lowest in the region while still operating a full service transit agency. From Executive Director, Curt Simon and his administrative staff, to the friendly corp of drivers, the Metro Transit family has shown a dedication to Omaha.

    Public transit ridership in Omaha grows year after year. The younger generation buys fewer cars and drives less and our aging population is looking for mobility options other than driving the role of transit is increasingly important. With volatile gas prices and a sluggish economy, people turn to a shared resource like transit as a financially viable option.

    Metro is working hard to make transit more accessible, more practical and comfortable. The updated fleet of buses and participation in Google Transit make the bus increasingly usable and convenient. The future of public transportation in Omaha is promising. Thank you, Metro, for forty years of service to our community.

    Sincerely,
    Kevin M. Flatowicz-Farmer, ModeShift Omaha
    Angela Eikenberry, ModeShift Omaha
    Mike Battershell, Greater Omaha Young Professionals
    Craig Moody, VOICE
    Patrick McAtee, Omaha Bikes

    Comments Off

    News

    Thursday, June 7th, 2012

    From Nebraskans for Civic Reform

    Contact: Adam Morfeld, 402-613-0724, adam.morfeld@nereform.org

    The analysis that is being published by The Reader and independently reviewed and analyzed by Nebraskans for Civic Reform is comprehensive, telling, and confirms an acute and disproportionate impact on certain segments of Douglas County. The analysis examines the impact of the Douglas County polling place closures based on income, race, age, mobility, and factors in average distance to polling place and average amount of polling locations lost based on the above factors.

    Below is a summary of the most compelling data from the analysis. If you have any questions please contact Adam Morfeld, executive director, Nebraskans for Civic Reform at 402-613-0724.

    Brief Summary of Data Analysis

    DISPARITY BY GEOGRAPHY: If you live east of 72nd St., the percentage increase in distance to your polling place is TWICE that if you live west of 72nd St.

    DISPARITY BY INCOME: If you live in a census tract with a median household income between $25,000 and $50,000, the percentage increase in distance to your polling place is THREE TIMES than if you live in a census tract with a median household income above $50,000.

    DISPARITY BY ETHNICITY: If you live in a census tract with a minority population exceeding 20 percent, the percentage increase in distance to your polling place is FIVE TIMES than if you live in a census tract with a minority population between 10 and 20 percent.

    DISPARITY BY EDUCATION: If you live in a census tract where less than 10 percent of the population holds a bachelors degree, the percentage increase in distance to your polling place is FIVE TIMES than if you live in a census tract where more than 50 percent of the population holds a bachelors degree.

    Who is Nebraskans for Civic Reform?

    Nebraskans for Civic Reform (NCR) is a non-partisan, non-profit organization dedicated to protect voting rights, make elections more accessible and strengthen K-12 civic education. NCR was founded in 2008 by young professionals and its Board of Directors consists of both Republicans and Democrats.

    Polling Place Closure Data Impact Analysis

    Comments Off

    News

    Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

    Omaha Community Coalition and Citizen Advisory Committee Members React to The Reader’s Compelling Polling Place Closure Impact Analysis

    Contact: Adam Morfeld, 402.613.0724, adam.morfeld@nereform.org

    WHEN: Wednesday, June 6th, 2012 at 2:00 PM

    WHO: Omaha Community Coalition & Several Members of the Douglas County Election Commissioner’s Citizen Advisory Committee

    WHAT: Press Conference and reaction to the release of detailed analysis illustrating the impact of Douglas County polling place closures

    WHERE: Meadow Lane Park directly across from the Douglas County Election Commission Office 225 N 115th Street Omaha, NE 68154

    OMAHA, NEBRASKA – On Wednesday, June 6th, 2012, numerous community leaders from North, South and West Omaha along with several members of the Douglas County Election Commissioner’s Citizen Advisory Committee will hold a press conference and react to the polling place impact data released by The Reader on Wednesday, June 6th.

    The analysis that is being published by The Reader is comprehensive, telling, and confirms an acute and disproportionate impact on certain segments of Douglas County. The analysis examines the impact of the Douglas County polling place closures based on income, race, age, mobility, and factors in average distance to polling place and average amount of polling locations lost based on the above factors.

    The press conference will also announce two public meetings with Commissioner Phipps on June 13th at the Latino Center of the Midlands in South Omaha and June 18th at the OIC in North Omaha.

    Comments Off

    Engagement & Community Involvement

    Monday, May 7th, 2012

    Voting is the foundation of a democracy. If you want your voice to be heard, you have to vote. Do you care about the environment? Check out the OPPD race. Do you care about education curriculum? Or do you pay property taxes? Check out the OPS Board races. Do you care about stem cell research? Check out the UN Board of Regents race.

    We’ve gathered information on the races and the candidates so that you can be an informed voter. Make sure to use your voice on May 15 in the primary and later this fall on November 6 in the general election.

    Voting Information

    Register to vote

    Early voting

    Find your polling location

    Find your district information

    How far are you from your polling place?

    Research Candidates

    We’ve put together a long list of links to help you learn more about the individual races and candidates.

    General Information

    League of Women Voter’s Guide

    Omaha World Herald Election Page

    Ballotpedia

    Voterinformation.org

    U.S. Senate Democrat

    Bob Kerrey
    Steven Lustgarten
    Larry Marvin
    Sherman Yates

    U.S. Senate Republican

    Jon Bruning
    Sharyn Elander
    Deb Fischer
    Pat Flynn
    Don Stenberg

    U.S. House of Representatives District 2 Democrat

    John Ewing
    Gwen Howard

    U.S. House of Representatives District 2 Republican

    Paul Anderson
    Glen Freeman
    Jack Heidl
    Brett Lindstrom
    Lee Terry - incumbent

    State Legislature

    All districts

    District 2
    Robert Howard
    Bill Kintner
    R. Paul Lambert – incumbent appointed in 2011
    Robyn Larson
    Mel Luetchens
    Ron Nolte

    District 5
    Heath Mello – incumbent elected in 2008

    District 7
    Christopher N. Geary
    Jeremy J. Nordquist – incumbent elected in 2008
    Adrian Petrescu

    District 9
    Vernon Joseph Davis

    Erica Fish

    Sara Howard

    District 11
    Ernie Chambers
    Brenda J. Council – incumbent elected in 2008

    District 13
    Timothy Ashford
    Tanya Cook – incumbent elected in 2008

    District 31
    Rick Kolowski
    Acela Turco

    District 39
    Judy M. Domina
    Beau McCoy
    - incumbent elected in 2008

    University of Nebraska Board of Regents

    District 8

    OPPD

    Candidate Bios

    Board of Education

    OPS Subdistrict 12

    Research the responsibilities and issues of the OPPD, MUD, Omaha Board of Education, and NRD positions.

    Our friends at the Progressive Research Institute prepared this great summary of the responsibilities of and issues facing the OPPD, MUD, OBoE, and NRD races. If you’ve ever wondered why these races and positions are important, give it a read. You’ll stop wondering immediate.

    Share with your networks

    Print a poster. Post this on Facebook. Change your avatar. Send an email. Whatever gets the word out to vote is fine with us.

    Comments Off

    VOICE Omaha